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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Collection: Locality Information Lewis and Clark as Naturalists
Locality Name:
Chamberlain
Brule County , South Dakota

Distance from Camp Dubois: 1,144 miles


Species Encountered:
icon-3 Antilocapra americana
Pronghorn
September 14, 1804
Near mouth of Bull Creek

The Corps began seeing a new large land mammal with forked horns and hooves in early September, 1804, as they made their way past the big bend of the ...  more>>

icon-3 Lepus townsendii
White-tailed Jack Rabbit
September 14, 1804

Lewis wrote a wonderfully detailed account of the white-tailed jackrabbit giving measurements (commonly leaps from 18 to 21 feet), physical descriptions ...  more>>

icon-4 Machaeranthera pinnatifida (Hook.) Shinners
lacy tansyaster
September 15, 1804
Possibly around mouth of White River

An image of the specimen in the Lewis and Clark herbarium. . . .
more>>

icon-3 Sylvilagus audubonii
Desert Cottontail
September 15, 1804
Near Mouth of White River

Lewis' pen went silent for long periods, or else his notes are lost.  Anyway, he did not tell us if he noticed anything different about the cottontails ...  more>>

icon-4 Artemisia dracunculus L.
tarragon
September 15, 1804
Near Mouth of White River

An image of the specimen in the Lewis and Clark herbarium. . . .
more>>

icon-4 Astragalus canadensis L.
Canadian milkvetch
September 15, 1804

An image of the specimen in the Lewis and Clark herbarium. . . .
more>>

icon-4 Astragalus missouriensis Nutt.
Missouri milkvetch
September 15, 1804

An image of the specimen in the Lewis and Clark herbarium. . . .
more>>

icon-4 Liatris pycnostachya Michx.
prairie blazing star
September 15, 1804

An image of the specimen in the Lewis and Clark herbarium. . . .
more>>

icon-1 Ectopistes migratorius
Passenger Pigeon
September 16, 1804

As with the Carolina parakeet, Lewis and Clark make only mundane reference to this then common bird.  To say "common bird" is hardly fathomable when ...  more>>

icon-1 Pica hudsonia
Black-Billed Magpie
September 16, 1804

The black-billed magpie is one of two live animals (see prairie dog) to survive shipping from Fort Mandan, South Dakota to Washington,...  more>>

icon-3 Odocoileus hemionus
Mule Deer, Black-tailed Deer
September 17, 1804

The Corps could not have overlooked this species as they were so accustomed to relying on deer for food, and there is only one other species in North ...  more>>

icon-3 Canis latrans
Coyote
September 18, 1804

Coyotes were not known in the eastern woodlands of Lewis' native Virginia at the time of the expedition.  By contrast, coyotes can be seen regularly ...  more>>

icon-4 Cleome serrulata Pursh
Rocky Mountain bee plant
August 29, 1806

An image of the specimen in the Lewis and Clark herbarium. . . .
more>>



Journal Entries:

Distance from Camp Dubois: 1,144 miles



 
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