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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

Bobcat

Capt. Clark, February 18, 1806--Whitehouse brought me a roab which he purchased of the Indians formed of three skins of the Tiger Cat, this Cat differs from any which I have ever seen. it is found on the borders of the plains and the woody Country lying along the Pacific Ocean. this animale is about the size or reather larger than the wild cat of our countrey and is much the same in form, agility and ferosity. the colour of the back, neck and sides, is a redish brown irregular varigated with small spots of dark brown the tail is about two inches long nearly white except the extremity which is black; it termonates abruptly as if it had been cut off. the belly is white with small black spots, butifully varigated. the legs are of the same colour with the sides and back marked with transvers stripes of black the ears are black on the outer side covered with fine black hair, short except at the upper point which is furnished with a pencil of verry fine streight black hair, 3/4 of an inch in length, the fur of this animale is long and fine much more so that the wild cat of the U. States but less so that the Louserva (ed. - loup cervier, or Lynx canadensis) of the N West. the nativs of this Country make great use of the skins of this cat, to form the robes which they wear; three whole skins is the complement usually employed and sometimes four in each roab. Those cats are not marked alike maney of them have but fiew spots of a darker colour, particularly on the back.

Capt. Lewis, February 21, 1806--The tyger Cat is found on the borders of the plains and in the woody country lying along the Pacific Ocean.  this animal is about the size or reather larger than the wild cat of our country and is much the same in form, agility and ferosity.  the colour of the back neck and sides is a redish brown irregularly variegated with small spots of dark brown    the tail is about two inches long nearly white except the extremity which is black; it terminates abruptly as if it had been cut off.  the belly is white with small black spots, beautifully variagated.  the legs are of the same colour with the sides and back marcked with transverse stripes of black    the ears are black on the outer side covered with fine short hair except at the upper point which [is] furnished with a pensil of fine, streight, black hair, 3/4 of an inch in length.  the fur of this anamal is long and fine, much more so than the wild cat of the United States but less so than that of Louservea [Canada lynx] of the N. West.  the natives in this quarter make great use of the skins of this Cat to form the robes which they wear; four skins is the compliment usuly employed in each robe.

Capt. Lewis, March 28, 1806--Drewyer also killed a tiger cat.

 
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