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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

silver salmon

Capt. Lewis, March 16, 1806-- The white Salmon Trout which we had previously seen only at the great falls of the Columbia has now made it's appearance in the creeks near this place.  one of them was brought us today by an Indian who had just taken it with his gig.  this is a likness of it ; it was 2 feet 8 Inches long, and weighed 10 lbs.  the eye is moderately large, the puple black and iris of a silvery white with a small addmixture of yellow, and is a little terbid near it's border with a yellowish brown.  the position of the fins may be seen from the drawing [see drawing on the right, ed.], they are small in proportion to the fish, the fins are boney but not pointed except the tail and back fins which are a little so,  the prime back fin and ventral ones, contain each ten rays ; those of the gills thirteen, that of the tail twelve, and the small fin placed near the tail above has no bony rays, but is a tough flexable substance covered with smooth skin.    it is thicker in proportion to it's width than the salmon.    the tongue is thick and firm beset on each border with small subulate teeth in a single series.  the teeth of the mouth are as before discribed.  neither this fish nor the salmon are caught with the hook, nor do I know on what they feed.

Capt. Clark, March 16, 1806-- The White Salmon Trout which we had previously seen only at the Great Falls of the Columbia, or a little below the Great Falls, has now made its appearance in the creeks near this place.  one of them was brought us to day by an Indian who had just taken it with his gig.  This is a likness of it ; it was 2 feet 8 Inches long, and weighed ten pountds.  the eye is moderately large, the puple black with a small admixture of yellow and iris of a silvery white with a small admixture of yellow and a little tirbed near its border with a yellowish brown.  the position of the fins may be seen from the drawing [see drawing on the right, ed.], they are small in perpotion to the fish. the fins are boney but not pointed except the tail and back fins which are a little so,  the prime back fin and ventral ones, contain each ten rays ; those of the gills twelve, that of the tail twelve, and the small finn placed near the tail above has no long rays, but is a tough flexable substance covered with smooth skin.    it is thicker in perpotion to its width than the salmon.  the tongue is thick and firm beset on each border with small subulate teeth in a single series.  the teeth of the mouth are as before discribed.  neither this fish nor the salmon are caught with the hook, nor do I know on what they feed. [they] now begin to run &.c&.c

 
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