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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

northern pikeminnow

Capt. Lewis, April 17, 1806-- .. the inhabitants of the rapids at this time take a few of the white salmon trout and considerable quantities of a small indifferent mullet on which they principally survive...

Capt. Lewis, April 29, 1806-- ..encamped on that river near a fish wear.  this wear consists of two curtains of small willow switches matted together with four lines of withs of the same materials exten[d]ing quite across the river,  parrallel with ea[c]h other and about 6 feet assunder.  those are supported by several parsels of poles placed in the manner before discribed of the fishingwears.  these curtains of willow are either roled at one end for a few feet to permit the fish to pass or are let down at pleasure.  they take their fish which at present are a mullet only of from one to five lbs., with small seines of 15 to 18 feet long drawn by two persons ; these they drag down to the wear and raise the bottom of the seine against the willow curtain.  they have also a small seine maniaged by one person it bags in the manner of the scooping net ; the one side of the net is confined to a simicircular bow of half the size of a man's arm and about 5 feet long, the other side is confined to a strong string which being attatched to the extremities of the bow forms the cord line to the simicircle.

Capt. Clark, April 29, 1806-- ..encampedon the river near a fish wear.  this wear consists of two curtains of small willow wattled together with four lines of withes of the same materials extending quite across the river,  parralal with each other and about 6 feet asunder.  those are supported by several parrelals of poles placed in this manner [Clark here inserted a drawing]   those curtains of willow is either roled at one end for a fiew feet to permit the fish to pass or are let down at pleasure.  they take their fish which at present are a mullet only of from one to five pounds wt. with small seines of 15 to 18 feet long drawn by two persons ; these they drag down to the wear and rase the bottom of the seine against the willow curtain.  they have also a small seine managed by one person, it bags in the manner of the scooping nets ; the one side of the net is confined to a simicircular bow of half the size of a mans arm and about 5 feet long, the other side is confined to a strong string which being attatched to the extremities of the bow forms the cord line to the simicurcle.

 

 
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