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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

thinleaf huckleberry

Capt. Lewis, February 7, 1806--There is a species of huckleberry common to the piny lands from the commencement of the Co1umbian valley to the seacoast; it rises to the hight of 6 or 8 feet. is a simple branching somewhat defuse stem; the main body or trunk is cilindric and of a dark brown, while the colateral branches are green smooth, squar, and put forth a number of alternate branches of the same co1our and form from the tWo horizontal sides only. the fruit is a small deep perple berry which the natives inform us is very good. the leaf is thin of a pale green and small being 3/4 of an inch in length and 3/8 in width; oval terminateing more accutely at the apex than near the insertion of the footstalk which is at the base; [veined, nearly] entire, serrate but So slightly So that it is scarcely perceptible; footstalk short and there position with rispect to each other is alternate and two ranked, proceeding from the horizontal sides of the bough only.

Capt. Clark, February 7, 1806--There is a species of huckkleberry common to the piney lands from the commencement of the Columbian Vally to the sea coast; it rises to the hight of 6 or 8 feet, is a simple branching, somewhat defused stem; the main body or trunk is cilindric branches are green smothe squar, and put forth a number of alternet branches of the same colour and form from the two horizontal sides only. the frute is a small deep purple berry which the nativs inform us is very good, the leaf is thin of a pale green and small being 3/4 of an inch in length and 3/8 in width; oval terminating more accoutely at the apex, than near the insersion of the footstalk which is at the base vened nearly entire; footstalks short and their position in respect to each other is alternate and too ranked, proceeding from the horizontal side of the bough only.

 
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