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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

western white pine

Capt. Lewis, February 6, 1806--No. 6 the white pine; or what is usually so called in Virginia. I see no difference between this and that of the mountains in Virginia; unless it be the uncommon length of cone of this found here, which are sometimes 16 or 18 inches in length and about 4 inches in circumpherence. I do not recollect those of virginia perfectly but it strikes me that they are not so long. this species is not common I have only seen it but in one instance since I have been in this neighbourhood which was on the border of Haley's bay on the N. side of the Columbia near the Ocean.

Capt. Clark, February 6, 1806--No. 6 the white pine; or what is usially so called in Virginia. I see no difference between this and that of the mountains in Virginia ; unless it be the uncommon length of the cone of this found here, which are sometimes 16 or 18 inches in length, and about 4 inches in surcumfrance. I do not recollect those of Virginia, but it strikes me that they are not so long. this species is not common I have seen it only in three instances since I have been in this neighbourhood, I saw a few on Baleys bay on the North side of the Columbia River, a fiew scattering on the sea coast to the North on one of which I engraved my name, and some on the S S E side of Ecola Creek near the Kilâmox nation, at which place I saw the white & red cedar.

 
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