Home Smithsonian: National Museum of Natural History Home
Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

hollyleaved barberry

Capt. Lewis, February 12, 1806--There are two species of ever green shrubs which I first met with at the grand rappids of the Columbia and which I have since found in this neighbourhood also; they grow in rich dry ground not far usually from some watercourse. the roots of both species are creeping and celindric. the stem of the Ist.is from a foot to 18 inches high and as large as a goosqu[i]ll; it is simple unbranc[h]ed and erect. it's leaves are cauline, compound and spreading. the leafets are jointed and oppositely pinnate, 3 pare & terminating in one, sessile, widest at the base and tapering to an accuminated point, an inch and a quarter the greatest width, and 3 inches & a 1/4 in length. each point of their crenate margins armed with a subulate thorn or spine and are from 13 to 17 in number. they are also veined, glossey, carinated and wrinkled; their points obliquely pointing towards the extremity of the common footstalk.   . . . . . the Ist. [ed. - this species] resembles the plant common to many parts of the U'States called the mountain holley.

Capt. Clark, February 12, 1806--There are two species of evergreen shrubs. This is the leaf of one [ed. - Captain Clark includes a drawing here]. which I first met with at the grand rapids of the Columbia River, and which I have sence found in this neighbourhood also; they usually grow in rich dry ground not far from some watercourse. the roots of both species are creeping and celindric. the stem of the first (as above) is from a foot to 18 inches high and as large as a goose quil; it is simple and erect. its leaves are cauline, and spredding. the leaf[l]its are jointed & oppositly poinnate 3 par and termonateing in one, cessile widest at the base and tapering to an accuminated point, an inch and 1/4 the greatest width, & 3 1/4 inches in length. each point of their crenate margins armed with a thorn or spine, and are from 13 to 17 in number. they are also veined, glossy, crinated and wrinkled; their points obliquely pointing towards the extremity of the common footstalk.  . . . . . the Ist. [ed. - this species] resembles a plant common to maney parts of the United States called the Mountain Holly.

 
Smithsonian Institution
Copyright Notice
Privacy Notice