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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

Cascade barberry

Capt. Lewis, February 12, 1806--The stem of the 2nd. is procumbent abo[u]t the size of the former (Mahonia aquifolium), jointed and unbranched. it's leaves are cauline, compound and oppositely pinnate; the rib from 14 to 16 inches long celindric and smooth. the leafets 2 1/2 inches long and I inch wide. greatest width 1/2 inch from their base, to which they are regularly rounded, and from the same point tapering to an accute apex, w[h]ich is mostly, but not invariably tirminated with a small subulate thorn. they are jointed and oppositely pinnate, consisting of 6 pare and terminating in one, sessile serrate, or like the teeth of a whipsaw, each point terminating in a small subulate spine, being from 25 to 27 in number; veined, smooth, plane and of a deep green, their points tending obliquely towards the extremity of the rib or common footstalk. I do not know the fruit or flower of either. the Ist. [ed. - Mahonia aquifolium] resembles the plant common to many parts of the U'States called the mountain holley.

Capt. Clark, February 12, 1806--The stem of the 2nd. is procumbent about the size of the former (Mahonia aquifolium), jointed and umbracated. its leaves are cauline, compound and oppositly pointed; the rib from 14 to 16 inches long celendric and smooth the leaf[l]its 2 1/2 inches long and I inch wide. the greatest width 1/2 inch from their base which they are regularly rounded, and from the same point tapering to an accute apex, which is mostly but not entirely termonated with a small subulate thorn. they are jointed and oppositly pointed, consisting of 6 par and termonateing in one (in this form.) sessile, serrate, or like the teeth of a whipsaw, each point terminating in a small subulate spine, being from 25 to 27 in numbr; [ed. - Captain Clark includes a drawing here] veined, smoth, plane and of a deep green, their points tending obliquely towards the extremity of the rib or common footstalk. I do not know the frute or flower of either. the Ist. [ed. - Mahonia aquifolium] resembles a plant common to maney parts of the United States called the Mountain Holly.

 
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