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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

seashore lupine

The captains described a licorice-flavored root while they were at Fort Clatsop

Capt. Clark, January 22, 1806--I observe no difference between the lickrice [licorice] of this countrey and that Common to maney parts of the United States where it is sometimes cultivated in our gardins. this plant delights in a deep lose sandy Soil; here it grows verry abundant and large; the nativs roste it in the embers and pound it Slightly with a Small Stick in order to make it Seperate more readily from the Strong liggaments which forms the center of the root; this they discard and chew and Swallow the ballance of the root; this last is filled with a number of thin membrencies like network, too tough to be masticated and which I find it necessary also to discard. This root when roasted possesses an agreeable flavour not unlike the Sweet potato.

Capt. Lewis, January 24, 1806--I observe no difference between the liquorice of this country and that common to many parts of the United states where it is also sometimes cultivated in our gardens. this plant delights in a deep loose sandy soil; here it grows very abundant and large; the natives roast it in the embers and pound it slightly with a small stick in order to make it seperate more readily from the strong liggament which forms the center of the root; this the natives discard and chew and swallow the ballance of the root; this last is filled with a number of thin membrenacious lamela [like net work], too tough to be masticated and which I find it necessary also to discard. this root when roasted possesses an agreeable flavour not unlike the sweet pittaitoe.

 
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