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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

Trumpeter Swan

Capt. Clark, October 19, 1804--our hunters killed 4 Elk 6 Deer & a pelican, I saw Swans in a Pond & killed a fat Deer in my walk, Saw about 10 wolves. This day is pleasant

Capt. Lewis, July 21, 1805--we saw three swans this morning, which like the geese have not yet recovered the feathers of the wing and could not fly we killed two of them the third escaped by diving and passed down with the current; they had no young ones with them therefore presume they do not breed in this country these are the first we have seen on the river for a great distance.

Capt. Lewis, March 9, 1806--The Large Swan is precisely the same common to the Atlantic States. the small swan differs from the larger one in size and it's note. it is about one fourth less and it's note is entirely different. the latter cannot be justly immetated by the sound of letters nor do I know any sounds with which a comparison would be pertinent. it begins with a kind of whistleing sound and terminates in a round full note which is reather louder than the whistleing, or former part; this note is as loud as that of the large swan. from the peculiar whistleing of the note of this bird I have called it the whistleing swan. it's habits coulour and contour appear to be precisely those of the large Swan. we first saw them below the great narrows of the Columbia near the Chilluckkittequaw nation. They are very abundant in this neighbourhood and have remained with us all winter. in number they are fully five for one of the large speceis.

Capt. Clark, March 9, 1806--The large Swan is precisely the same common to the Missouri, Mississippi and the Atlantic States &c. the small swan differ only from the large one in size and it's note. it is about one 1/4th less, and its notes entirely different. the latter cannot be justly immetated by the sound of letters nor do I know any sounds with which a comparison would be pertinent. it begins with a kind of whistling sound and terminates in a round full note which is reather louder than the whistling, or former part; this note is as loud as that of the large swan. from the peculiar whistling of the note of this bird I have called it the Whistling Swan. it's habits coulour and contour appear to be precisely those of the large swan. we first saw them below the great narrows of the Columbia near the Chilluckkittequaw nation. they are very abundant in this neighbourhood and have remained with us all winter. in number they are fully five for one of the large species of the swan's.

Capt. Lewis, March 28, 1806--we have seen more waterfowl on this island than we have previously seen since we left Fort Clatsop, consisting of geese, ducks, large swan & Sandhill crains.

Capt. Clark, March 28, 1806--we have seen more waterfowl on this island than we have previously seen since we left Fort Clatsop, consisting of Geese, Ducks, large Swan & Sand Hill crains.

Capt. Lewis, March 29, 1806--great numbers of both the large and small swans, gees and ducks seen to day. the former are very abundant in the ponds where the wappetoe (ed.  - the broadleaf arrowhead [Sagittaria latifolia]) is found, they feed much on this bulb.

Capt. Clark, March 29, 1806--Great numbers of the whistling swan, Gees and Ducks in the Ponds.

 
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