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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

Raccoon

Capt. Clark, June 13, 1804--Capt Lewis and myself walked to the hill, from the top of which we had a butifull prospect of Serounding countrey, in the open Prarie we caught a racoon, our hunter brought in a Bear and Deer, we took some Lunar observations this evening.

Sgt. Gass, October 21, 1805--We saw among them some small robes made of the skins of grey squirrel, some racoon skins, and acorns, which are signs of a timbered country not far distant.

Capt. Clark, January 2, 1806--the fur of both the beaver and otter as also the rackoon in this countrey are extreemly good;

Capt. Lewis, February 25, 1806--The Rackoon is found in the woody country on this coast in considerable quantities. the natives take a few of them in snars and deadfalls; tho’ appear not to vallue their skins much, and but seldom prepare them for robes.

Capt. Lewis, March 19, 1806--other robes are formed in a similar manner of the skin of the Rackoon, beaver &c. at other times the skin is dressed in the hair and woarn without any further preperation. in this way one beaver skin, or two of those of the Raccoon or tiger catt forms the pattern of the robe.

Capt. Clark, March 19, 1806--other robes are formed in a similar manner of the skin of the rackoon, beaver &c. at other times the skins is dressed in the hair and worn without any further preparation. in this way one beaver skin or two of the rackoon or tiger cat forms a vest and covers the body from the armpits to the waist, and is confined behind, and destitute of straps over the sholder to keep it up.

Capt. Clark, September 10, 1806--we Saw Deer rackoons and turkies on the Shores to day   one of the men killed a racoon which the indians very much admired.

 
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