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Lewis & Clark as Naturalists
The Journals Lewis and Clark as Naturalists

Fisher

Capt. Clark, February 19, 1806--The black Fox or as they are more frequently called by the N West Trader Fisher is found in the woody country on this coast.  how this animal obtained the name of fisher I know not, but certain it is, that the name is not appropriate; as it does not prey on fish, or seek it as a prey.  they are extreemly active strong and made for climbing which they do with great agility, and bound from tree to tree in pursute of the squirel or Rackoon, their natural and most usual food.  their colour is a jut Black except for a small spot of white on the breast.  the body is long, legs short and formed Something like the turn-spit Dog, with a remarkable long tail.  it does not differ here from those of the United States.

Capt. Lewis, February 21, 1806--. . .  the Black-Fox, or as they [are] most frequently called in the neighbourhood of Detroid, Fisher.  is found in the woody country on this coast.  how this animal obtained the name of fisher I know not, but certain it is, that the name is not appropriate; as it dose not prey on fish, or seek it as a prey.  they are extreemly active strong and prepared for climbing, which they do with great agility, and bound from tree to tree in pursuit of the squirrel or Rakoon, their natural and most usual food.  their colour is a jut [jet] black except for a small spot of white on the breast.  the body is long, legs short and formed Something like the tern-spit Dog, with a remarkable long tail.  it dose not differ here from those of the United States.

 
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