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The narwhal, with its unique spiral tusk, has inspired legend in Inuit society and fascinated people across cultures for centuries. This new exhibition will dive deep into the narwhal's Arctic world to explore what makes this mysterious animal and its changing ecosystem so important.

a pod of several narwhals swimming at water's surface and seen from above, their tusks clearly visible A pod of several narwhals swimming at water's surface and seen from above, their tusks clearly visible. © Manu San Felix.

Narwhal: Revealing an Arctic Legend will present Inuit perspectives on their connections to narwhals as well as the latest scientific knowledge about these fascinating animals. Through first-hand accounts from scientists and Inuit community members, the exhibition will reveal how traditional knowledge and experience, coupled with scientific research, heighten our understanding of these animals – and our changing global climate.

The exhibition will display real narwhal tusks and skulls, intricate Inuit artwork and cultural artifacts, a fossil whale skull from an extinct narwhal relative, and an 18-foot, life-sized model of a male narwhal suspended above the exhibition gallery. Visitors will be immersed in the narwhal's Arctic environment via breathtaking panoramic landscape images and a soundscape of shifting ice, flowing water, narwhal vocalizations, and Arctic birdcalls.

Visitors can also explore hands-on activities with museum volunteers, and engage face to face with experts on climate, the Arctic, narwhals, and members of Inuit communities. Check the museum event calendar for "Expert Is In" program dates and times.

Dr. Martin Nweeia and Adrian Arnauyumayuq holding a narwhal tusk and preparing to release it after conducting research Dr. Martin Nweeia and Adrian Arnauyumayuq prepare to release a narwhal after conducting research into tusk sensory function off Qaqqiat Point in Admiralty Inlet, Nunavut, Canada. © Gretchen Freund, Narwhal Tusk Research.
a print, titled, 'A Woman Who Became a Narwhal' by artist Germaine Arnaktauyok Germaine Arnaktauyok (1946-) is a highly acclaimed Inuit artist. Much of her work—including this print, titled, "A Woman Who Became a Narwhal" —focuses on her interpretations of Inuit oral tradition. © Stephen Loring.


Children of an Inuit community on bicycles and smiling before a camera A group of Inuit children from Pond Inlet, located in the Nunavut territory of Canada. The majority of Canada's Inuit population lives in Nunavut—about 30,000 people. © Pamela Peeters, Narwhal Tusk Research.

Inuit hunter dressed in white paddling in a kayak with a harpoon attached A Greenland Inuit hunter paddling in a kayak with a harpoon attached. © Wili Hybrid.

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